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Sutton Coldfield Osteopathy Clinic2021-01-09T15:08:40+00:00

Covid-19 Update – January 2021

As Osteopathy falls under “medical and healthcare” we will remain open at all times. The guidance says that individuals can be outside of their homes for specific purposes, which include ‘for any medical concerns, reasons, appointments and emergencies’. Guidance from the General Osteopathic Council, our governing body, has stipulated, that if we have the correct processes and standard operating procedures in place, we are safe to provide osteopathy during the pandemic.

To make a booking please click on MAKE A BOOKING, or text me on 07805208225, or Fill in the contact form. If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to get in touch. Looking forward to seeing you soon, Pete

Hello

Welcome to Sutton Osteopathy, located in the heart of Sutton Coldfield. My name is Peter Andrews, and I qualified as an osteopath in 2008. I am based at the Sutton Coldfield Health Clinic [link to Google maps] on While Road, near to The Empire Cinema. My goal is to reduce people’s pain, and to help their bodies to function better. I feel immensely privileged to practise osteopathy, and continuously seek to refine and broaden my skills.

Osteopathy it not about forcing the body to change through a set procedure or techniques It’s about respectfully working with the body, through the skilled and gentle application of hands, to assist the body’s own healing processes.

Osteopathy is about life-long learning…there is always so much to learn, which is why I am constantly updating my knowledge and skills. I use cranial osteopathy alongside a wide range of other techniques, including spinal manipulation, soft-tissue and harmonic techniques. My approach as an osteopath is to carefully consider each patient’s needs and to develop a treatment plan which is aimed at bringing you long-term benefits and pain relief.

“Remember, none but a thoroughly skilled hand with a cultivated touch, guided by an educated brain should deal with the delicate structure of the human body.”

A.T. Still (founder of osteopathy)

Hello

Welcome to Sutton Osteopathy, located in the heart of Sutton Coldfield. My name is Peter Andrews, and I qualified as an osteopath in 2008. I am based at the Sutton Coldfield Health Clinic [link to Google maps] on While Road, near to The Empire Cinema. My goal is to reduce people’s pain, and to help their bodies to function better. I feel immensely privileged to practise osteopathy, and continuously seek to refine and broaden my skills.

Osteopathy it not about forcing the body to change through a set procedure or techniques It’s about respectfully working with the body, through the skilled and gentle application of hands, to assist the body’s own healing processes.

Osteopathy is about life-long learning…there is always so much to learn, which is why I am constantly updating my knowledge and skills. I use cranial osteopathy alongside a wide range of other techniques, including spinal manipulation, soft-tissue and harmonic techniques. My approach as an osteopath is to carefully consider each patient’s needs and to develop a treatment plan which is aimed at bringing you long-term benefits and pain relief.

“Remember, none but a thoroughly skilled hand with a cultivated touch, guided by an educated brain should deal with the delicate structure of the human body.”

A.T. Still (founder of osteopathy)

Videos

The Covid-19 situation has prompted me into creating some self help videos with the help of my family who are more tech savvy than me!

Click here to view my YouTube video channel. I will be adding more videos over time which will help you learn how to stretch and maintain mobility from home.

Accredited by all the major health insurance providers

Accredited by all the major health insurance providers
About Peter

Originally from London, I have lived in Sutton Coldfield since 1990, having got married and decided it was a great place to bring up our children. My first experience of Birmingham was when I studied at Aston University in 1984-88, when I did a degree in French and Business Administration. I did some voluntary work in Asia for year, then worked in the automotive industry for the next 15 years. In 2003 I decided to retrain as an osteopath, mostly because of the excellent results my wife had enjoyed while having osteopathy treatment during her first pregnancy. So, between 2003-2008 I attended Oxford Brookes University and graduated with a First Class Honours degree. Outside of my work as an osteopath I enjoy broadening my knowledge about human health, and I regularly swim, cycle, run and practise yoga.

Osteopathy is about life-long learning…there is always so much to learn, which is why I am constantly updating my knowledge and skills. I use cranial osteopathy alongside a wide range of other techniques, including spinal manipulation, soft-tissue and harmonic techniques. My approach as an osteopath is to carefully consider each patient’s needs and to develop a treatment plan which is aimed at bringing you long-term benefits and pain relief.

Read more about Osteopathy here

“I want an osteopath of good repute to take care of this family and keep it in good working condition.” Mark Twain
Special Interest

Osteopaths consider the whole body as inter-related, which is why it is important to treat the whole person. Most osteopaths have areas which are of particular interest to them. Over the years I have developed a special interest in treating shoulder problems, breathing conditions, headaches, migraines, balance, and scoliosis.

Read more about Peter’s approach to Osteopathy here

Osteopathy is a science, an art and a philosophy.

“When a man works with his hands he is a labourer. When he works with his hands and his mind, he is a craftsman. When he works with his hands, his mind, and his heart, he is an artist.” A.T. Still (founder of osteopathy)

FAQs
Can I bring someone with me?2019-04-05T12:17:03+00:00

Of course!

How many treatments will I need?2019-04-05T12:16:38+00:00

This is difficult to say. Some people just need a little help, one or two sessions, whereas other people with chronic conditions may benefit from ongoing regular treatment. A lot of people choose to see an osteopath on a regular basis as a way of preventing aches and pains from deteriorating.

Is osteopathy treatment painful?2019-04-05T12:16:09+00:00

Osteopathy is known for being safe, gentle but effective in its approach. Some people do experience soreness for 24-48 hours after a treatment; this is a normal response.

What should I wear?2019-04-05T12:15:23+00:00

Please wear whatever makes you feel comfortable and relaxed. This is the most important thing. You may be asked to remove your outer clothing so that a full examination can be made – however, if you would rather not do this, it is not a problem.

Does the medical profession recognise osteopathy?2019-04-05T12:14:46+00:00

Yes, the British Medical Association’s guidance is that GPs can safely refer patients to osteopaths, and many do in my experience.

How are osteopaths regulated?2019-04-05T12:14:04+00:00

The title “osteopath” is protected in law, which means that each osteopath must have met certain educational standards and keep up to date in their clinical practice. My registration number is 7081 with the General Osteopathic Council, the governing body.

How do I training to become an osteopath?2019-04-12T10:41:15+00:00

The essence of osteopathy is to reduce people’s pain and improve their function through the skilled application of the osteopath’s hands. Osteopaths are taught how to use their hands to diagnose problems with the human body, and to use various techniques to assist the body back to health. Each person is different, so what is appropriate for one person may not be suitable for another person. To train as an osteopath takes a minimum of 4 years full-time, so you can rest assured that you are in safe hands. Being a safe practitioner is one of the foundations of an osteopath’s training i.e. how to avoid making an injury/condition worse, and knowing when to refer the person to their GP.

Nature does not jump from the abnormal back to the normal. Step by step she retraces herself; that is why it takes time for the chronic cases to recover. See that you patients understand this.” A.T. Still
Fees
  • First visit lasts up to an hour and costs £60

  • Subsequent visits last up to 40 minutes and cost £45

  • Payment method is by cash, cheque or card

Location

PARKING

Sutton Osteopathy is based within the Sutton Coldfield Health Clinic, not far from the Empire Cinema. There is usually parking at the front of the building, but there are times when the car park gets full. There are pay and display car parks about a 5 minute walk away, on Duke Street (accessed either from Duke Street, or Holland Street (then turn right into Farthing Lane) and at the rear of the cinema on Holland Road. The nearest available on street parking which is free of charge is probably on Maney Hill Road, which is a little over a 5 minute walk away.

Pete is great. he sorted my shoulder.

Caroline, Computer Consultant

BPPV and Epley manoeuvre

BPPV and Epley manoeuvre The Epley manoeuvre is a highly effective treatment for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV), the most common cause of vertigo. (By way of explanation, the word benign means good i.e. not harmful; paroxysmal means sudden attack; positional means it only occurs on certain movements; and vertigo means to turn i.e. it is the illusion of movement.) It is often worse in the act of lying down, turning over in bed, getting up from a lying down position, or when looking up. BPPV is a disorder of the inner ear, and arises when a tiny crystal

Sciatica

What is Sciatica? Sciatica is the name given to pain caused by irritation of the sciatic nerve. The pain can range from mild to severe. The sciatic nerve begins in the buttock region, and is the coming together of 5 separate nerves exiting from the lumbar spine and sacrum; so, the sciatic nerve, technically speaking, can’t exit from the spine because it hasn’t been formed at that point. Sciatica arises mostly from 2 causes: An intervertebral disc pressing on one of the nerves which make up the sciatic nerve – depending on the extent of the injury, the

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